July 2015 Science Bulletin #1: Systematic review of EDCs and T2 diabetes; PFOS and male genital abnormalities; and more

July 13, 2015 at 2:49 pm | Posted in News and Science Bulletins | Leave a comment
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July 2015 Science Bulletin #1:
Human Research

EDCs, T2 diabetes | Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals, Risk of Type 2 Diabetes, and Diabetes-Related Metabolic Traits: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. Persistent and non-persistent EDCs may affect the risk of T2D. There is an urgent need for further investigation of EDCs, especially non-persistent ones, and T2D risk in large prospective studies.

Pesticides, ADHD | Association of pyrethroid pesticide exposure with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in a nationally representative sample of U.S. children. Study finding an association between increasing pyrethroid pesticide exposure and ADHD which may be stronger for hyperactive-impulsive symptoms compared to inattention and in boys compared to girls. Given the growing use of pyrethroid pesticides, these results may be of considerable public health import.

Solvents, breast cancer | Occupational exposure to solvents and risk of breast cancer. This study suggests that there may be an association between occupational exposure to aliphatic and aromatic solvents and the risk of breast cancer at the low levels of exposure experienced by women in this study.

PFCs, genital abnormalities | Perfluorooctane Sulfonate Concentrations in Amniotic Fluid, Biomarkers of Fetal Leydig Cell Function, and Cryptorchidism and Hypospadias in Danish Boys. Environmental PFOS exposure was associated with steroid hormone and INSL3 concentrations in amniotic fluid, but was not associated with cryptorchidism or hypospadias in our study population. Additional studies are needed to determine whether associations with fetal hormone levels may have long-term implications for reproductive health.

POPs, breast cancer | DDT Exposure in Utero and Breast Cancer. This prospective human study links measured DDT exposure in utero to risk of breast cancer. Experimental studies are essential to confirm results and discover causal mechanisms. Findings support classification of DDT as an endocrine disruptor, a predictor of breast cancer, and a marker of high risk. See news coverage here (Washington Post).

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